Project firefly the toaster sized satellite!

The small satellite, with a big mission, is appropriately named “Firefly.” Sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the pint-sized satellite will study the most powerful natural particle accelerator on Earth — lightning — when it launches from the Marshall Islands aboard an Air Force Falcon 1E rocket vehicle next year.

Although no one knows why, it appears that flashes of gamma rays that were once thought to occur only far out in space near black holes or other high-energy cosmic phenomena are somehow linked to lightning.

Using measurements gathered by Firefly’s instruments, Goddard scientist Doug Rowland and his collaborators hope to answer what causes these high-energy flashes. In particular, they want to find out if lightning triggers them or if they trigger lightning. Firefly is expected to observe up to 50 lightning strokes per day, and about one large TGF every couple days.

This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?10645

Philip Newman

Philip Newman is a Private Pilot, Software Engineer, Businessman and Part Time Soldier in the New Zealand Army. His story started with the gift of a camera and a ride in an aeroplane. Now he can frequently be found at airshows taking photos. He enjoys writing about Aviation but mostly just reposts things from other social websites. Everyone knows of him but no one has met him.

One thought on “Project firefly the toaster sized satellite!

  • October 23, 2017 at 10:27 am
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    I wonder if this is something that Kiwi kids could get into with RocketLabs shooting things into space.

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